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Can a CEO Opt-out of Earnings Calls?
October 21, 2013

In case you missed it, last week Google’s CEO announced that he may not be joining future earnings calls. Some news reports are citing vocal chord troubles, while Page himself suggested it was a need for him to “ruthlessly prioritize.” But how can Larry Page be a CEO if he can’t talk? Do they do all of their strategy meetings via Google Hangout? And if it is a question of priorities, shouldn’t his shareholders be a priority four times a year?

Many are citing the precedent of Steve Jobs opting out while battling cancer, which was obviously an extreme example. Others may recall Jeff Bezos who was very clear that he wasn’t going to concern himself with Wall Street’s short term priorities. But that didn’t mean he didn’t show up.

What are the implications of a CEO stepping back from investor relations commitments like a 4-times-per-year call? I’ve had many a client over two decades that would prefer to decline the quarterly firing squad known as the analyst call. And I’ve had a few that probably would have been doing their Company, and their shareholders, a service by playing hooky on those days.

We know that at least one-third of a Company’s valuation is tied to intangibles. When pressed to get specific about what those things are, quality of management, leadership and vision are the most frequently cited variables. Perhaps Google feels that the CEO-investor version of playing hard to get will increase his perceived value?

Woody Allen said it best, “Eighty percent of success is just showing up.” My view: if you want to be the CEO, you have to show up.

Carreen Winters brings nearly two decades of corporate communications expertise to her position at MWW Group with special emphasis in corporate and executive positioning, reputation management, crisis communications, restructuring and financial transactions, employee communications and labor relations.

Posted by cwinters on October 21, 2013 at 4:59 pm

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